P12
Inequality and Climate Justice in an Overheated World

Convenors:
Astrid Stensrud (University of Agder)
Elisabeth Schober (University of Oslo)
Discussant:
Ben Campbell
Format:
Panels
Location:
Senate House - Court Room
Start time:
28 May, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The causes and effects of climate change are linked to the workings of global capitalism, the striving for economic growth, increasing social inequalities and the making of environmental justice claims. How is the double bind between economic growth and ecological viability negotiated?

Long abstract:

The causes and effects of climate change are connected to the workings of global capitalism, the striving for economic growth, increasing social inequalities and environmental justice claims. This panel will explore human-environment-capital relationships in a world that is undergoing accelerated change, and discuss how issues of climate change and environmental crisis can be articulated together with issues of inequality vs. justice. In the midst of heated debates surrounding global warming and mitigation plans, governments all over the world continue to strive for economic growth, while popular movements - especially in the Global South - increasingly link claims for environmental and social justice in their struggles. Climate debt and climate justice are concepts that are used to demonstrate how the causes and effects of global warming are unequally distributed between the Global North and South and between the rich and the poor. Given that climate change often intersects with the making of livelihoods, we ask how the double bind between material wealth and ecological viability is negotiated. How are everyday dilemmas of economic survival versus life in a healthy environment dealt with? What are the needs, desires and qualms that people with different stakes in the global economy have? How are ideas of blame, responsibility and justice produced and connected to questions of livelihood and imaginations of the future? Knowledge about changes in the weather and climate is often fragmented and chaotic; how are different forms of knowledge made, scaled and connected to economic practices in people's daily life?