P25
At home in mobility: ethics of hospitality and belonging

Convenors:
Hazel Tucker (University of Otago)
Donna Keen (University of Otago)
Location:
D
Start time:
10 December, 2008 at 8:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

Aiming to explore ideas of hospitality and belonging within a highly mobile world, this panel considers ways in which contested notions of home, belonging, host and guest are negotiated and performed within and across various sites of house, region and nation.

Long abstract:

Notions of home have become increasingly complex within a highly mobile world (Jackson 1995; Morley 2000). Historically, the western notion of home as a fixed, permanent location has been used as a colonising mechanism to appropriate the spaces of the colonised. For example, the practice of Terra Nullius signified land as without ownership regardless of the presence of nomadic groups. However, in a post colonial context in which increased mobility has continued to displace and transform the notion of home, the ethics of belonging has increasingly been called into question. Subsequently, also, notions of host and guest are increasingly reconfigured and contested. The panel thus seeks to address questions such as: Where do the bounds of hospitality lie?; Who decides or has the right to claim sovereignty in order to offer or create the home?; How are citizenship and national identity materialised through appropriation of spaces and what are the ethical implications of claiming a home to host?; Within settler societies who can be host and who is guest? Contributions to this session will engage with issues of home and hospitality such as the use of land and resources within a post colonial context and the performance of individual acts of hospitality. The panel thus aims to provide opportunity to explore ways in which contested notions of home, belonging, host and guest are negotiated and performed within and across various sites of house, region and nation.