EASA2012: Uncertainty and disquiet

Nanterre University, France, 10/07/2012 – 13/07/2012

(W099)

How to tame, play or skirt environmental uncertainties?

Location V508
Date and Start Time 12 Jul, 2012 at 11:30

Convenors

Nathalie Ortar (ENTPE) email
Françoise Lafaye (ENTPE/UMR CNRS EVS) email
Anne-Sophie Sayeux (Université Clermont-Ferrand 2 - PAEDI - UMR CNRS ADES/ Bordeaux) email
Olivier Sirost (Université de Rouen) email
Mail All Convenors

Short Abstract

In this workshop we want to question how individuals and society cope with an uncertain environment. How an uncertain environment can also be considered as ecologically resilient and smoothing? What are the bypass practices and resistance to announced risks?

Long Abstract

To cope with environmental uncertainties, individuals and groups have established strategies. In this workshop we want to question how individuals and society cope with an uncertain environment. How an uncertain and therefore anxiogenic environment can also be considered as ecologically resilient and smoothing? What are the bypass practices and resistance to announced risks? How do individuals and society manage the anxious anticipation of possible disasters? What dissonances may exist between risks identified by scientific experts and uses of nature experienced in everyday life?

To guide the discussion two thematics are proposed:

1-Taming uncertainty: how our daily practices enable us to domesticate or deny uncertainties related to human relationships with nature? What do individuals do to cope with environmental latent or real degradation? We will examine patterns of consumption, travel, citizen engagement offering in some measure control over concerns about an uncertain future. Moreover, in this context, experts and scientists discourses and practices play a vital role. At different levels, ecological resilience and green chemistry express a desire to control, but also a great diversity in the ways to overcome this uncertainty.

2- Bypass and games of uncertainty: which uses of nature can allow individuals to play with risks associated to nature or bypass them? How these activities give us the opportunity to escape daily life anxiety and control uncertainty? We will question sports and recreation practices associated to nature, but also "slow" movements in order to understand if they are used as a response to collectives' uncertainties.

This workshop is closed to new paper proposals.

Papers

From transition to resilience: how to cope in an uncertain world

Author: Nathalie Ortar (ENTPE)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

How our daily practices enable us to domesticate or deny uncertainties related to human relationships with nature? Where do individuals seek help? The communication is going to try to answer to those two questions. To support this reflection a fieldwork has been conducted in Palo Alto (California) in a Transition group.

Long Abstract

How do our daily practices enable us to domesticate or deny uncertainties related to human relationships with nature? Where do individuals seek help? The communication is going to try to answer to those two questions thanks to a resarch conducted in the Bay area (California). "Transition towns" is an international association with local antennas around the world. The aim is to create a resilient community in a post carbon society. To reach this aim, the group in Palo Alto is repeatedly conducting some reading groups about the books edited by the association whose aim is to create the condition for a change of behavior. During a fieldwork conducted in 2010-2011 several reading groups have been followed.

For this presentation I will first present who the people following those readings are and what their motivations are. In the second part of the presentation I will question how do individuals do to cope with environmental latent or real degradation, what kind of patterns of consumption and citizenship emerge and to what respect they offer a control over concerns about an uncertain future.

Les silences du nucléaire: questions à l'ethnologie / "silences" of nuclear power:some questions to ethnology

Author: Françoise Lafaye (ENTPE/UMR CNRS EVS)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Alors que les tenants et les détracteurs du nucléaire s'opposent depuis des décennies, les populations vivant à proximité des équipements tiennent des discours desquels le danger est absent. Pour l'ethnologue, cette absence pose à la fois des problèmes de « collecte », mais aussi d'interprétation.

Long Abstract

Le nucléaire n'est pas un phénomène en soi, c'est la perspective d'analyse adoptée par le chercheur qui va lui conférer son statut d'objet d'étude. A chacun sa manière de penser le monde, si l'ethnologue utilise des catégories pour penser une situation et la définir, les autochtones eux-mêmes disposent de catégories qui leur sont propres et organisent leur univers. Expliquer un phénomène en ethnologie, c'est notamment mettre au jour les catégories qui leur permettent de le penser.

Lors d'un terrain de recherche portant sur l'implantation d'une centrale nucléaire dans le sud-ouest de la France, les récits recueillis n'évoquaient pas la centrale comme un choix politique conduisant à la scission d'une collectivité locale en plusieurs groupes, définis en fonction de leurs prises de position. La centrale nucléaire ne semblait pas non plus être conçue comme la mise en œuvre d'une technologie dangereuse. Mes informateurs l'évoquaient au travers des changements survenus dans leur vie quotidienne.

Ce silence sur les dangers du nucléaire parmi les populations environnantes d'un site à risques est constaté dans d'autres recherches. Mais il pose une question essentielle à l'ethnologue qui se voit interpréter un phénomène en l'absence de discours : en quoi ne réifie-t-il pas le danger inhérent au nucléaire ? En outre, qu'il soit considéré comme un déni ou comme la contrepartie de l'apport financier que constituent ces gros équipements pour les communes, sur quelles logiques s'appuient ces interprétations et pourquoi sont-elles exclusives ?

Where is the fish? Controversies around fish degradation and conservation practices in the Danube Delta artisanal fisheries

Author: Veronica Mitroi  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Analysing the fishing rights evolution in the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve during the last 20 years, this communication presents fish resource degradation as a space of uncertainty where different actors participate to delimitate, define and tame fish as an environmental problem.

Long Abstract

Environmental management of renewable natural resources such as fish must deal with factors of complexity and uncertainty. Indicators and proofs of sustainable fisheries are built on the ground, while experimenting different fishing rights systems. Fishing rights and practices influence not only resources' material condition but they also directly participate to the dialectics of environmental uncertainties around resource degradation and sustainable management measures.

Fish catches have the ambiguous status of being both: the result of a human activity having a social, economical and cultural function, and one of the main criteria of fish resource estimation grounding conservationist actions. Uncertainties about fish resource degradation are therefore not strictly ecological, but also social, economical and cultural. One of the main difficulties in fisheries administration is precisely to define, border and give an operational content to "fish degradation", able to mobilise actors and change practices.

Based of an ethnographic analyse of Danube Delta fisheries administration, this article shows the construction of sustainable fisheries indicators and practices through "hybrid forums" where actors from different spheres participate: scientists, administrators, control and custody bodies, fishermen and commercialisation firms, ecological NGOs. In a context of transition from an intensive communist fishing industry to an ecological administration of fish inside a biosphere reserve, the persistence of illegal fishing practices and overfishing despite the introduction of more restrictive fishing rules, illustrates the complexity of uncertainty in small artisanal fisheries administration: What signifies fish degradation and what is its space of movement between different actors, fields and scales? How fishermen cope with "degradation" and how they integrate the ecological and political restriction in their practices?

All these questions, source of interactions, conflicts and alliances between actors, represent the space of controversies around fish as object of conservationist policies. The protection of fish resource appears not only as the field of coordination between different actors, but also as the "factory" were actors and resources are redefined together, taming new forms of "ecological interaction" between social actors and natural resources.

Forecasting not to see the future: comments on the performatic dimensions of climate forecasting

Author: Renzo Taddei (Federal University of Sao Paulo)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Using materials from ethnographic work among meteorologists and the "rain prophets" in Northeast Brazil, this paper explores the activity of forecasting as a social performance, and its role in the attempt to manipulate the salience of climate uncertainties to local populations.

Long Abstract

This paper analyses the activity of forecasting as a social performance, in which talking about the future affects living and acting in the present. Focusing on the main metaphors and tropes used in climate forecasting - using materials from ethnographic work among meteorologists and the "rain prophets" in Northeast Brazil -, the research explores the pragmatic interplay between science genres, religious narratives and political processes, in the collective but uncoordinated attempt to manipulate the degrees to which uncertainties about the climate and about the potential effects of climate events are salient to local populations.

The magic(ians) of snowflakes: climate change, techniques of 'snow reliability', and bodily desires on the European alpine glaciers

Author: Herta Nöbauer (University of Vienna)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

This paper explores the control of uncertainty on the Austrian Alpine glaciers. It argues that 'snow reliability' and a wider specific loop of insecurity and security shaped by manifold actors and desires play a fundamental role in managing the Alpine environment.

Long Abstract

My paper explores the control of multiple uncertainties in the Austrian Alpine glaciers. The latter have been considered as being dangerous, worthy of respect, and simultaneously attractive by the local population and alpinists for a long time. Today they are exposed to manifold changes and contestations: Ahead of all they have been turned into attractive sites for global all-season event tourism and important training places for skiing teams. At the same time, Alpine glaciers are dramatically retreating as an effect of climate change and thus have increasingly become a focus of environmental scientists and environmentalists. On the other hand, glaciers have been strongly promoted as representing the last reservation for providing natural 'snow reliability' by the tourist and sports industry in the past few decades. In fact, snow, this form of 'natural' and climate 'security' is literally melting away in the mountain regions. Providing and promising 'snow reliability' therfore has turned into a, if not the key hot slogan of the competitive tourist industry. Employing global technology for snow making plays a crucial role for granting the promise of 'snow reliability' even on the glaciers. As I will argue this all-around present technology is extensively entangled with the Alpine environment and human bodies; it is transformed into a hybrid.

Tracing examples from my current ethnographic research on a glacier in the region of Tyrol I furthermore argue that there is even a wider specific loop of security and insecurity which is shaped by manifold actors and capitalist, political and cultural desires such as global technology and economy, tourist industry, bodily desires for risk and fun, scientific discourses, and environmentalist interests. Together these interfere in decisive and often contradicting ways.

Engaging nature: climate change in the Peruvian Andes

Author: Mattias Borg Rasmussen (University of Copenhagen)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Located amongst peasants in the Peruvian highlands, this paper takes a critical gaze at ways of engaging with nature through an analysis of the ‘mind and minding’ of environmental uncertainties in the context of global climate change

Long Abstract

Since times immemorial, environmental uncertainties have been part of the everyday in the Andes. However, as climate change challenges the ways of engaging nature in mountain regions around the globe, people are increasingly forced to deal with the environment in new ways. Based on 12 months of fieldwork in and around the small provincial capital Recuay in northern Peru, this paper will discuss what climate change looks like from a position that is both at the margins of society and in front row of climate change, and how this is dealt with on different levels of society. In her writings on uncertainty Whyte (2009) argues that uncertainty is about 'mind and minding', i.e. that something is uncertain because we care and it is important to us, and this in turn prompts us to act in a certain way. On Mind: The first part of the paper takes a critical gaze at 'nature', asking how current anthropological studies of climate change challenges our understanding of the environment, and how these insights might enlighten the analyses of environmental change in the Andes. On Minding: The second part of the paper will take up the issue of 'engagement', thus providing a discussion of how people involve themselves in uncertain matters of the surroundings. Thus, I will argue that by looking at ways of engaging nature as forms of minding we can approach the multiple strategies and tactics employed by people in order to act, counteract, and anticipate upon an environment in flux.

La résilience des seino marins dans l'estuaire de la Seine

Author: Olivier Sirost (Université de Rouen)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

L'estuaire de la Seine est considéré comme le plus anthropisé de France et le plus pollué d'Europe. C'est aussi un formidable terrain de jeu pour les seino marins qui bravent au quotidien ce milieu à forts enjeux environnementaux et économiques. Cette contribution propose d'analyser les stratégies de resilience developpées par les populations dans un milieu à risques

Long Abstract

L'estuaire de la Seine est situé entre deux agglomérations fortement industrialisées ou transite près de la moitié de l'activité économique française. L'estuaire est connu pour ses fortes pollutions des années 1970 et ses taux records actuels de PCB ou HAP. Égout à ciel ouvert drainant les déchets de Paris l'estuaire de la Seine développe en son embouchure de multiples activités touristiques. Dans le fleuve en partie aval 5000 navigants sportifs se frottent à la navigation commerciale se jetant aussi à l'eau. 7 bases de loisirs issues d'exploitations de carrière, plus de 5000 jardiniers sur terrains contaminés et de nombreux pêcheurs à pieds complètent le tableau.

Ils bravent les interdictions, jouent en espaces naturels protégés comme en zone Ceveso et pris dans leurs jeux oublient les risques tout en les connaissant. En eux résonne par fragments un estuaire à la mort annoncée. Cette capacité de résilience construite fait des seino marins des risqueurs pas comme les autres dans une logique de développement durable transfigurée.

Le surf et l'incertitude de la nature : une résilience quotidienne

Author: Anne-Sophie Sayeux (Université Clermont-Ferrand 2 - PAEDI - UMR CNRS ADES/ Bordeaux)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Face à une société en crise, tant du point de vue environnemental que sociétal et économique, l’incertitude de la nature permet à certains individus de se libérer des angoisses quotidiennes en jouant avec l’instabilité des éléments. En choisissant un point de vu local : l’ethnologie du surf au Pays basque et sud des Landes (au sud du Sud-Ouest de la France), on peut comprendre plus globalement en quoi l’incertitude propre à la nature offre aux pratiquants une parenthèse ataraxique que l’on pourrait envisager comme résiliente.

Long Abstract

Les crises successives qui traversent nos sociétés contemporaines engendrent certaines angoisses qui pèsent au quotidien : difficultés professionnelles, économiques voire familiales, peur de l'avenir. Pour autant, certains, à travers leurs pratiques en nature, trouvent une réponse leur permettant de se libérer, ne serait-ce qu'éphémèrement, du poids du quotidien. Dés lors, l'incertitude des éléments naturels n'est plus une valeur négative mais bien un ancrage positif pour les pratiquants de surf.

Un terrain de plusieurs années a montré comment le fait de jouer quotidiennement avec une nature aléatoire leur permet de résister à l'anxiété sociale, en adaptant leur temps-vécu au temps de la nature incertaine. Ainsi cette nature là n'est pas celle des catastrophes incontrôlables et des cataclysmes, mais bien celle du jeu avec l'incertitude : l'alea (Caillois, 1957). Même si sur la vague, la peur peut être ressentie par les surfeurs, cette peur n'est pas anxiogène, elle est un plaisir à renouveler sans cesse, « un cri de jouissance et de douleur » (De Certeau, 1990).

Ainsi, cette communication souhaite éclairer en quoi l'individu, par son contact avec la nature et son immersion en elle, résiste, de manière éphémère peut être, aux failles de notre société. L'homme peut alors trouver dans l'environnement une force de résilience face aux incertitudes des sociétés contemporaines, en se réappropriant alors une nature bienfaisante.

Where should we play tomorrow? 'Extreme sport', uncertain environment and the ludic excesses of the post-sovereign subject

Author: Allen Abramson (University College London)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Far from being a trivial 'line of light' from key social relations in the present, 'extreme sports' play with the uncertainty inhering in the future key social relation of late-modernity. Mainstream social processes all begin to locally converge upon this seemingly trivial ludic sphere.

Long Abstract

How do 'extreme sports' (e-sports) articulate with the uncertainties of risk society and (its) environment? How important is it to pose this question at all? Most accounts of e-sport link its genesis and growing cultural significance to primary social relations in the present: viz. to extensions of neo-liberal ethos in the ludic realm or to 'lines of flight' from its various orders into the deeper authenticities of 'experience', 'flow' and 'intensity'. But, what (else) do we observe if, by contrast, we opt to see extreme sport playing out exaggerated scenarios not of the hegemonic present but of an ideal and emergent future? Specifically, we can show that the agonistic delivery of a sovereign 'champion' to the crowd or the nation is now replaced in e-sport (where e stands for 'environment' as much as 'extreme') by an epic actor who leaves the crowd for the game, who projects the game from elite spaces into the 'environment', and who transforms the environment in question into a variegated continuum of wilderness, artifice, periphery, city, 'outdoors', outer and inner body. Permeated generally with uncertainty, the name of the game in this fractal environment is the location/construction of specific edges or limit-positions designed to test and excite the playful incarnations of perilously perched post-sovereign subjects. Such subjects delight in mastering practice at points where environmental uncertainty clouds its precarious positions and threatens to extinguish them. No surprise, then, that mainstream social processes (e.g. charity; 'personal development'; corporate interest) begin to re-group on the ludic basis of this key social relation of the future rather than upon its discursive supports. All of these processes can be ethnographically traced and further explored across the sector and in local scenes - such as an indoor climbing wall - where current research is focusing.

Brouillage perceptif et incertitude. Exemple de construction d'une représentation religieuse comme moyen d'apprivoiser l'incertitude environnementale

Author: Baptiste Gille (University of Oxford)  email
Mail All Authors

Short Abstract

Reposant sur des stimuli perceptifs contradictoires, les agents surnaturels peuvent être pensés comme des représentations permettant d'apprivoiser un environnement hostile, en s'appuyant sur une incompréhension et un trouble perceptif initial.

Long Abstract

Il s'agit de montrer en l'exemplifiant que de nombreuses représentations religieuses peuvent être perçues comme des mécanismes d'apprivoisement des incertitudes environnementales. Les sites sacrés, les lieux où vivent les esprits, sont souvent inscrits dans un paysage particulier, parfois singulièrement hostile ou inhabituel. Nous voulons montrer qu'à un niveau individuel ou collectif, les représentations religieuses permettent de créer une certaine relation d'apprivoisement, de compréhension de ce même environnement. Cela à deux niveaux :

(1) d'abord parce que ces représentations religieuses se nourrissent elles-mêmes de l'incertitude dans laquelle ces environnements placent les individus. Il s'agit ici de mettre en lumière les principes d'incertitude cognitives qui régissent l'ostension des agents surnaturels : les agents surnaturels sont souvent perçus dans un environnement naturel ennemi, soit la nuit, dans la forêt, sous la pluie, etc. Ils sont appréhendés via un certain nombre de stimuli perceptifs contradictoires, c'est-à-dire que pour qu'un individu perçoive un être surnaturel, il faut qu'il se trouve préalablement en position d'incertitude sensorielle, qui ne répond pas forcément à sa manière quotidienne d'être-au-monde. Nous présenterons la théorie de la contre-intuition minimale (Boyer 2001) en montrant en quoi l'incertitude dans la relation à l'environnement est un élément crucial de la détection de la présence d'agent surnaturel dans un paysage donné.

(2) Ensuite, à un second niveau, nous proposons l'idée que ces agents surnaturels eux-mêmes, permettent de dominer certaines peurs, de surmonter ces situations d'incertitude, de transformer l'inconnu en connu, ou du moins, de donner les outils pour entrer en interaction avec cet environnement hostile. Imputer la présence d'un dieu ou d'une divinité dans des lieux dangereux, permet par exemple de se donner les moyens d'interagir avec l'environnement comme on interagit avec un agent, de socialiser ce qui apparaît d'abord sans intention, ou avec des intentions hostiles, et donc de créer un véritable processus d'apprivoisement. Il s'agit donc de transformer en quelque sorte - mais cette idée est à creuser davantage - une « incertitude négative » en « incertitude positive » (permettant une certaine maitrise). Ce que nous considérons ici comme un processus d'apprivoisement peut se définir comme une relation de personne à personne, d'agent à agent. Les êtres surnaturels permettent donc d'apprivoiser un environnement incertain : leur présence permet aux individus d'imputer une agentivité à un environnement donné, de s'y sentir mieux. Certaines représentations religieuses peuvent être considérées comme des moyens de dompter, d'apprivoiser un environnement hostile, en le faisant entrer dans des interactions socialisantes.

This workshop is closed to new paper proposals.