P24
China and the rising powers as development actors: looking across, looking back, looking forward [Rising Powers Study Group]

Convenors:
Khalid Nadvi (University of Manchester)
Alex Shankland (Institute of Development Studies)
Jennifer Hsu (University of Alberta)
Emma Mawdsley (University of Cambridge)
Discussant:
Emma Mawdsley
Location:
Room 6 (Examination Schools)
Start time:
13 September, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
4

Short abstract:

The emergence of China and fellow 'rising powers', such as Brazil, India, South Africa and Russia, is having a profound impact on international development. This panel examines the multiple interrelated ways in which rising powers are (re-)shaping international development trajectories.

Long abstract:

The emergence of China and other so-called 'rising powers', including but not limited to Brazil, India, South Africa and Russia, is having a profound impact on international development. This panel examines some of the multiple interrelated ways in which rising powers are (re-)shaping international development trajectories. What characterises China as a development actor? What theoretical contributions can be derived from analysing Chinese development practices or those of other rising powers? How do rising powers' domestic policies to tackle inequality, for instance via social welfare or labour standards, influence other countries? How are their development cooperation activities constructed and contested by multiple actors in ways that defy both conventional framings of "state", "private sector" and "civil society" and easy categorisations of "aid" and "investment"? How effective and transformative are their development activities on recipient countries? How is the past shaping South-South cooperation, whether at the level of geopolitics, bilateral and trilateral cooperation or the individual development encounter? Finally, to what extent has the sharp economic slowdown across the emerging economies called into question not only these countries' own future development trajectories but also their ability to shape those of low-income countries? We invite papers that will broaden the horizons of the debate on rising powers and development, addressing one or more of these themes: • Rising powers in international development: blurred boundaries, diverse actors and contested politics beyond the state-business-civil society divide • Identity, history, memory and the politics of South-South Development Cooperation • China as a development actor • Rising powers and future development trajectories