P45
Living with and through profusion: narrating selves and shaping futures

Convenors:
Jennie Morgan (University of Stirling)
Zemirah Moffat (Insightful Moves)
Location:
Science Site/Chemistry CG60
Start time:
6 July, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Profusion - or an abundance of material and digital things - is a phenomenon of contemporary patterns of consumption. This panel looks at how strategies for dealing with profusion express, (re)configure, and/or provide alternatives to late-modern temporal, social, moral, and political formations.

Long abstract:

There is growing consensus that contemporary life is characterised by an abundance of material and digital things. Geographically and temporally nuanced, this is accompanied by 'overflow' and 'excess' of other entities - e.g. information, commodities, tasks, technologies, and resulting choices (Czarniawska and Löfgren 2012, 2013). Coping with profusion is a key challenge for all; concerns issues of sustainability, stewardship, and legacy; and confronts individuals, communities, organisations, and households alike. Yet, while challenging, dealing with profusion also provides a plethora of opportunities for creativity, agency, self-narration, and the shaping of anticipated futures. Responding to the conference themes (temporalities of economic exchange in particular) we invite researchers to consider profusion as a phenomenon of contemporary patterns of consumption. How do strategies and approaches for dealing with profusion express, (re)configure, and/or provide alternatives to temporal, social, moral, and political formations associated with late-modernity; or, as our title implies, how do ways of living with and through profusion shape selves and futures? When addressing these questions, specific topics might include (but should not be limited too): * ethnographic accounts of keeping and discarding * (in)equalities and power relations of profusion * sensory, material, affective, and/or experiential qualities of profusion * anthropological theories of excess * impacts of material and digital excess on health and well-being * prolific pasts, sentimentality, and abundant heritage We welcome papers from all anthropological disciplines, as well as papers that include non-textual media such as video, sound, photography, and illustration.